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Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

8 edition of Bosses, machines, and urban voters found in the catalog.

Bosses, machines, and urban voters

an American symbiosis

by John M. Allswang

  • 76 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Kennikat Press in Port Washington, N.Y .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Municipal government -- United States -- History,
    • Politicians -- United States -- History

    • Edition Notes

      StatementJohn M. Allswang.
      SeriesInterdisciplinary urban series, National university publications
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsJS309 .A37
      The Physical Object
      Paginationix, 157 p. ;
      Number of Pages157
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4539863M
      ISBN 100804691940, 0804692025
      LC Control Number77006299

      The corrupt political bosses got voters for their parties by doing favors for people such as offering turkey dinners, summer boat rides, providing jobs for immigrants, and helping needy families. The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs in the United States that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic candidates from until the late s. It made the Democratic Party the majority party nationally during that period. Democrats lost control of the White House only to Dwight D. Eisenhower, a pro-New Deal Republican and war hero, in and.

      Bosses, Machines and Urban Voters. John M. Allswang $ - $ The Initiative and Referendum in California, John M. Allswang $ Popular Categories. Bosses, Machines, and Ethnic Groups By ELMER E. CORNWELL, JR. ABSTRACT: The boss and his urban machine, though products of many factors, were virtually unthinkable without their immi-grant clienteles. These gave the machine its essential mass base. And the .

      P. Eisinger, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 2 Changing Preoccupations of Urban Politics. In the heyday of the ethnic political machine, the object of politics was to win control of local government in order to get access to its cs was a means of livelihood. Thus, the Irish, skillful practitioners of the politics of patronage, came to. STANDARD Urban Political Machines REVIEW CSS Specific Objective Review 33 Specific Objective: Analyze the effect of urban political machines and responses to them by immigrants and middle-class reformers. Read the chart to answer questions on the next page. Urban Political Machines Responses by Immigrants Responses by Middle-Class.


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Bosses, machines, and urban voters by John M. Allswang Download PDF EPUB FB2

Political machines, and the bosses who ran them, are largely a relic of the nineteenth century. A prominent feature in nineteenth-century urban politics, political machines mobilized urban voters by providing services in exchange for voters' support of a party or by: Bosses, Machines, and Urban Voters Revised Edition by Professor John Allswang (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or Bosses of a book Cited by: Bosses, machines, and urban voters: An American symbiosis (Interdisciplinary urban series) [Allswang, John M] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Bosses, machines, and urban voters: An American symbiosis (Interdisciplinary urban series). Get this from a library. Bosses, machines, and urban voters. [John M Allswang] -- Interprets political machines and urban voting.

A concluding chapter on "Black cities, white machines" examines Bosses post-Daley politics of Chicago and the rise of Harold Washington. Political machines, and the bosses who ran them, are largely a relic of the nineteenth century.

A prominent feature in nineteenth-century urban politics, political machines mobilized urban voters by providing services in exchange for voters' support of a party or candidate. John M. Allswang is the author of Bosses, Machines, And Urban Voters ( avg rating, 1 rating, 0 reviews, published ), A House for All Peoples ( 3/5(3).

Urban bosses, machines, and progressive reformers, Volume Bruce M. Stave. Heath, - History Schenectady settlement workers social reform society street structure success Tammany Hall tion Tweed upper class urban politics urban reform vote voters ward boss ward politics Urban Bosses, Machines, Bosses Progressive Reformers, Bruce M.

Several books of readings have appeared in recent years, reflecting an increased interest in bossism that is due largely to an increased interest in urban history generally. Bruce M. Stave and Sondra Astor Stave, ed., Urban Bosses, Machines, and Progressive Reformers, 2d.

rev. (Malabar, Fla., ) is a good collection on both the machines. Start studying History (Urban Bosses & Urban Political Machine) ~ Lecture 4.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. A political machine is a political group in which an authoritative leader or small group command the support of a corps of supporters and businesses (usually campaign workers), who receive rewards for their machine's power is based on the ability of the boss or group to get out the vote for their candidates on election day.

Although these elements are common to most political. 15 The Rise and Fall of Urban Political Patronage Machines Joseph D.

Reid, Jr., and Michael M. Kurth Urban Patronage: Its Common History One of the most notable political changes of the past hundred years is the rise and fall of urban patronage machines.

In most years between andCited by: 9. reformers, John M. Allswang's Bosses, Machines, and Urban Voters examines the voting bases for Bosses Tweed and Murphy in New York and Thompson, Cermak, and Daley in Chicago. Although maintaining that there was little to choose between Bosses Ed Crump and Tom Pendergast and reformer.

Bosses, Machines, and Urban Voters: An American Symbiosis. By John M. Allswang. (Port Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat, ix + pp. Map, tables, notes, for further Author: Michael H. Ebner. On election day, a massed army of small-time thugs and hoodlums returned the favors of the Tweed Ring by stuffing ballot boxes with votes for Tweed and intimidating voters.

Decline of the Machine. Political machines began to decline in importance after Led by Thomas Nast's cartoons the Tammany Hall machine came down and others soon followed. schools, hospitals, and orphanages.

Bosses could also provide government support for new busi-nesses, a service for which they were often paid extremely well. It was not only money that motivated city bosses. By solving urban problems, bosses could reinforce voters’ loyalty, win additional political support, and extend their Size: KB.

In dealing with the new urban environment of the late 19th century, which group was more 3 Educator Answers Despite the evidence of corruption, political machines retained strong public support. the development of urban public parks. Political bosses were often able to defeat "good government" reformers in the American cities of the late nineteenth century because: the party machines aided cities' poor and immigrant populations.

Write an essay that describes how urban political machines gained and maintained their power in the nineteenth century. Your essay should explain the strategies machine “bosses” used to achieve support from voters and describe how they used.

Tammany Hall, or simply Tammany, was the name given to a powerful political machine that essentially ran New York City throughout much of the 19th century. The organization reached a peak of notoriety in the decade following the Civil War, when it harbored "The.

more sensational aspects of urban politics, concentrating instead on the power relationships, especially on the relationship between political machines and the voters. It is assumed (with of Progressive era machine bosses in mind, should have wider application for thinking aboutFile Size: 79KB.

John M. Allswang is Professor of History at California State University, Los Angeles. He is the author, most recently, of California Initiatives and Referendums, A Survey and Guide to Research and Bosses, Machines, and Urban Voters (Revised Edition).Parties were especially powerful in the post–Civil War period through the Great Depression, when more than 15 million people immigrated to the United States from Europe, many of whom resided in urban areas.

Party machines, cohesive, authoritarian command structures headed by bosses who exacted loyalty and services from underlings in return.Urban political machines and their bosses are among the topics in American politics that are most shrouded in legend and myth. The outright corruption, dictatorial tactics, favoritism, and inefficiency of machine politics outraged many commentators and campaigners at the end of the 19th century.